Chimneys in the Desert: Industrialization in Argentina during the Export Boom Years, 1870-1930

Chimneys in the Desert: Industrialization in Argentina during the Export Boom Years, 1870-1930

Chimneys in the Desert: Industrialization in Argentina during the Export Boom Years, 1870-1930

Chimneys in the Desert: Industrialization in Argentina during the Export Boom Years, 1870-1930

Synopsis

This book offers new topics and new perspectives on the economic history of Argentina before the 1930 Depression. It focuses on the evolution of early industrialization in a country primarily associated with cattle-ranching and agriculture, and single-mindedly characterized as a case of a successful export economy. Taking an original approach, the book cross-examines traditional economic issues such as production and finances, and new cultural patterns, such as consumption, the role of women, paternalism, and ideology.

The first years of Argentina's industrialization, from the 1870s to the 1920s, coincided with a time of great innovation, a brisk turn from tradition, and quick modernization. This book shows that industry not only helped Argentina's economy along, but spearheaded its modernization. It challenges the long-lasting "canonical version" that industry was a victim of a capital market and a state extremely hostile to manufacturing. Access to financing for industrial endeavors was much easier than previously thought, while the state supported industry through tariffs.

Excerpt

This book describes how industry changed Argentina, an allegedly agrarian country, during a historical period of major transformations. the period begins in the 1870s—when an already ongoing modernization deepened— and ends with the 1930 Depression—when many dreams associated with this process died. in those sixty years, the country's economic, social, political, and cultural traits dramatically changed. Argentina became a rising star in an internationalized economy; its population grew from two to twelve million, its gross domestic product (GDP) multiplied by twenty, its exports by eighteen, and its imports by fifteen. the country, wrecked by decades of civil wars and severe instability after gaining independence from Spain in the 1810s, seemed to be experiencing a miracle, attracting immigrants and capital in a way that surprised contemporaries. During that period, Argentina enjoyed its best economic performance in its entire history.

This so-called “belle époque” has usually been considered the outcome of a successful agrarian and export experience. From this perspective, the transformation was founded on wool, grain, and beef sales abroad, to the effect that scholar research has focused, for better or for worse, on this aspect of the Argentine experience. By contrast, this book attempts to demonstrate that this traditional approach only partially accounts for a more complicated process.

Chimneys in the Desert focuses on an atypical economic sphere and moves in a direction different from traditional studies on international trade. Whereas scholarly research focused on sales abroad from agrarian activities . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.