Food, Drink and Identity in Europe

Food, Drink and Identity in Europe

Food, Drink and Identity in Europe

Food, Drink and Identity in Europe

Synopsis

Scholars across the humanities and social sciences are increasingly examining the importance of consumption to changing notions of local, regional, national & supranational identity in Europe. As part of this interest, anthropologists, historians, sociologists and others have paid particular attention to the roles which food and drink have played in the construction of local, regional and national identity in Europe. This volume provides the first multidisciplinary look at the contributions which food and alcohol make to contemporary European identities, including the part they play in processes of European integration and Europeanization. It provides theoretically informed ethnographic and historical case studies of transformations and continuity in social and cultural patterns in the production and consumption of European foods and drinks, in order to explore how eating and drinking have helped to construct various local, regional and national identities in Europe.

Excerpt

Eating and drinking have increasingly been considered by scholars
in the humanities and social sciences as constituent elements in the
creation and reproduction of local, regional and national cultures
and identities in Europe. Such approaches are also part of the
newer scholarship on Europeanization and European integration
which has turned to issues of social identification in its attempt to
identify forces that will enhance or hinder the realization of an
ever closer union. This essay reviews some of the current concerns
in the scholarship on food and drink and their roles in identity
and identification in localities, regions and nations in Europe. It
also introduces the themes that link the historical and
contemporary case studies that make up the volume which it
precedes.

Scholars have increasingly researched and theorized social eating and drinking over the last decade. This growing attention has sought to examine food and drink within their contemporary and historical social contexts, in order to explore the changing nature of these

Teodora Hasegan of the Department of Anthropology, Binghamton Univer
sity, worked tirelessly on the preparation and copy-editing of this essay and the
volume it introduces, and Tanya Miller of the same department provided valuable
bibliographical support in the writing of this essay. I am grateful to them both.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.