Building a Better Bridge: Muslims, Christians, and the Common Good : A Record of the Fourth Building Bridges Seminar Held in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, May 15-18, 2005

Building a Better Bridge: Muslims, Christians, and the Common Good : A Record of the Fourth Building Bridges Seminar Held in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, May 15-18, 2005

Building a Better Bridge: Muslims, Christians, and the Common Good : A Record of the Fourth Building Bridges Seminar Held in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, May 15-18, 2005

Building a Better Bridge: Muslims, Christians, and the Common Good : A Record of the Fourth Building Bridges Seminar Held in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, May 15-18, 2005

Synopsis

Building a Better Bridge is a record of the fourth "Building Bridges" seminar held in Sarajevo in 2005 as part of an annual symposium on Muslim-Christian relations cosponsored by Georgetown University and the Archbishop of Canterbury. This volume presents the texts of the public lectures with regional presentations on issues of citizenship, religious believing and belonging, and the relationship between government and religion -- both from the immediate situation in Bosnia-Herzegovina and from three contexts further afield: Britain, Malaysia, and West Africa.

Both Christian and Muslim scholars propose key questions to be faced in addressing the issue of the common good. How do we approach the civic sphere as believers in particular faiths and as citizens of mixed societies? What makes us who we are, and how do our religious and secular allegiances relate to one another? How do we accommodate our commitment to religious values with acknowledgment of human disagreement, and how can this be expressed in models of governance and justice? How are we, mandated by scriptures to be caretakers, to respond to the current ecological and economic disorder of our world?

Michael Ipgrave and his contributors do not claim to provide definitive answers to these questions, but rather they further a necessary dialogue and show that, while Christian and Islamic understandings of God may differ sharply and perhaps irreducibly, the acknowledgment of one another as people of faith is the surest ground on which to build trust, friendship, and cooperation.

Excerpt

This volume presents a record of the fourth in the Building Bridges series of international Christian-Muslim seminars, held in Sarajevo, BosniaHerzegovina, May 15–18, 2005. Convened by the Archbishop of Canterbury and jointly hosted by Dr. Mustafa Ceric; Rais al-Ulama of the Muslim community of Bosnia-Herzegovina; Metropolitan Nikolaj of the Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Dabar-Bosnia; and Cardinal Vilko Puljic, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sarajevo, the theme of the seminar was “Muslims, Christians, and the Common Good.” The participants, who met for three days of public lectures and private conversations, had brought home to them the particular poignancy and relevance of this global theme in the Bosnian context. Ten years previously, Serbian Orthodox, Croatian Catholics, and Bosniac Muslims had all been engaged in a series of bitter conflicts where religious belonging had been implicated with ethnicity and culture in a complex nexus of contested identities. Now, as all communities faced the challenge of building a nation and a civic society, the challenge facing Christians and Muslims was to move on from identity-based politics to ask about the resources each could bring from the riches of their tradition to offer to the common good. Given the continuing scars people bore from the enmities of the past, this was no mean challenge, but contributions from locally based Catholics, Orthodox, and Muslims helped to ground and focus the seminar's discussions of global themes by constantly bringing them back to this one particular context. Four presentations from the former Yugoslavia are included in this volume, along with three case studies from other parts of the world.

The eight public lectures also presented here show Christian and Muslim scholars engaging from the depths and riches of their own traditions with three . . .

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