The Naked Truth: Why Hollywood Doesn't Make X-Rated Movies

The Naked Truth: Why Hollywood Doesn't Make X-Rated Movies

The Naked Truth: Why Hollywood Doesn't Make X-Rated Movies

The Naked Truth: Why Hollywood Doesn't Make X-Rated Movies

Synopsis

Kevin S. Sadler is an assistant professor of media arts at the University of Arizona.

Excerpt

Our characters are made of wood and have no genitalia. If the puppets
did to each other what we show them doing, all they'd get is splinters.

—Scott Rudin, producer of Team America: World Police
People get shot in the head and bashed to a bloody pulp in movies all
the time, but we get an NC-17 for a glimpse of pubic hair. Why is that,
do you think?

—Wayne Kramer, director of The Cooler

Take ONE: Puppet sex. Two naked marionettes “making love.” This explicit two-minute sequence from Team America: World Police was given an NC-17 (no one seventeen and under admitted) in September 2004 by the Rating Board of the Classification and Rating Administration (CARA), the movie rating system operated by the Motion Picture Association of Amer- ica (MPAA). Contractually obligated to deliver an R-rated product (under seventeen requires accompanying parent or adult guardian) to Paramount, the filmmakers Trey Parker and Matt Stone—who four years earlier had a similar ratings ruckus over South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999)— resubmitted the scene nine times with various alterations before the Rating Board agreed to change the NC-17 to an R. “They said you can't do any- thing but missionary position,” remarked Parker, as his production team eventually whittled down the first cut of the scene from two minutes to forty-five seconds for theatrical release. the final cut of the edited puppet- passion sequence expunged many shots of nontraditional lovemaking prac- tices, including moments of defecation and urination, while scenes featuring gory bullet-ridden bodies, gruesome dismemberments, and other forms of marionette-on-marionette violence remained untouched. For Parker this incongruity represented CARA's hypocritical treatment of sim- ulated sex and simulated violence. “We blow [a puppet of actress] Janeane . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.