The Passion for Life: A Messianic Lifestyle

The Passion for Life: A Messianic Lifestyle

The Passion for Life: A Messianic Lifestyle

The Passion for Life: A Messianic Lifestyle

Excerpt

It is indeed eventful when a major German systematic theologian attempts to do theology from the perspective of a layperson in the congregation. The split between academic theology and the experience of ordinary Christians may not be once and for all overcome in this book, but Jiirgen Moltmann has set out here with the clear recognition of the futility of a Christian theology which is not devoted to the life of the congregation.

Modern theology has often given lip service to Christian theology's dependence on the church. The so-called father of modern Protestant theology, Friedrich Schleiermacher, was aware of this when he began his great dogmatic work with this thesis: “Since dogmatics is a theological discipline, and thus pertains solely to the Christian church, we can only explain what it is when we have become clear as to the conception of the Christian church.” Theologians down through Barth and Tillich have echoed this assumption. But this insight can remain abstract if theology is not also aware from the beginning that the life and future of the church is wrapped up with the gathered congregation. Unfortunately modern theology has been unwilling to accept this second truth as a presupposition of its work.

And understandably sol The formation of the Christian congregation has become increasingly difficult in the industrialtechnocratic world in which Freud wondered whether it might not be impossible after all to form any kind of community. Thus theology has preferred to deal, on the one hand, with the question of how to know the truth of Christianity from its . . .

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