The Housing Divide: How Generations of Immigrants Fare in New York's Housing Market

The Housing Divide: How Generations of Immigrants Fare in New York's Housing Market

The Housing Divide: How Generations of Immigrants Fare in New York's Housing Market

The Housing Divide: How Generations of Immigrants Fare in New York's Housing Market

Synopsis

"An excellent and timely volume, very well written, clearly organized, and cogently argued." - Douglas S. Massey, author of Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Mexican Immigration in an Era of Economic Integration

"The Housing Dividebrilliantly transforms the Big Apple into a crystal ball for glimpsing the racial and ethnic future of 21st century America. The core finding--that, just as in the past, racial discrimination keeps Americans with African ancestry from taking advantage of opportunities used by the newest immigrants and their children to get ahead--portends a troubling future in which American society may cleave between blacks and non-blacks. This book is a wake-up call to America to finally address racial discrimination in housing." - Richard Alba, co-author of Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration

"The Housing Dividetakes a hard look at housing and neighborhood quality in the nation's largest and most diverse city. It exposes longstanding features that are found in most American cities, including the potential for upward mobility by some immigrant newcomers, the traps that others fall into, and the continuing reality of racial discrimination that limits progress for too many New Yorkers." 3151;John R. Logan, editor of The New Chinese City: Globalization and Market Reform The Housing Divideexamines the generational patterns in New York City's housing market and neighborhoods along the lines of race and ethnicity. The book provides an in-depth analysis of many immigrant groups in New York, especially providing an understanding of the opportunities and discriminatory practices at work from one generation to the next. Through a careful read of such factors as home ownership, housing quality, and neighborhood rates of crime, welfare enrollment, teenage pregnancy, and educational achievement, Emily Rosenbaum and Samantha Friedman provide a detailed portrait of neighborhood life and socio-economic status for the immigrants of New York. The book paints an important, if disturbing, picture. The authors argue that not only are Blacks- regardless of generation- disadvantaged relative to members of other racial/ethnic groups in their ability to obtain housing in high-quality neighborhoods, but that housing and neighborhood conditions actually decline over generations. Rosenbaum and Friedman's findings suggest that the future of racial inequality in this country will increasingly isolate Blacks from all other groups. In other words, the "color line" may be shifting from a line separating Blacks from Whites to one separating Blacks from all non-Blacks.

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