The Grace Abbott Reader

The Grace Abbott Reader

The Grace Abbott Reader

The Grace Abbott Reader

Excerpt

Grace Abbott led a lifelong fight for justice on behalf of those least able to claim justice for themselves—a cause that she saw as crucial to a larger “struggle for fundamental change” within society as a whole. This belief was central to Abbott's career as a reformer and government leader—from her early days at Jane Addams's Hull House settlement, through her years as director of Chicago's Immigrants' Protective League, and culminating in her influential tenure as chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau in Washington DC.

In addition to her lasting achievements for children and immigrants, Abbott also took an important part in the struggle to establish women's role in government, including her breakthrough accomplishments as the first person sent to represent the United States on a League of Nations committee and as the first woman in American history nominated for a presidential cabinet post.

Throughout her impressive career, Abbott held a deep belief in the power of well-crafted words, as this volume makes clear. She published extensively, her name becoming familiar to readers of, on the one hand, scholarly journals such as the Social Service Review or the American Journal of Sociology and, on the other, to the much larger audiences available to her as a columnist for the Chicago . . .

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