Direct Compositionality

Direct Compositionality

Direct Compositionality

Direct Compositionality

Excerpt

The theoretical focus of this series is on the interfaces between subcomponents of the human grammatical system and the closely related area of the interfaces between the different subdisciplines of linguistics. The notion of 'interface' has become central in grammatical theory (for instance, in Chomsky's recent Minimalist Program) and in linguistic practice: work on the interfaces between syntax and semantics, syntax and morphology, phonology and phonetics etc. has led to a deeper understanding of particular linguistic phenomena and of the architecture of the linguistic component of the mind/brain.

The series covers interfaces between core components of grammar, including syntax/morphology, syntax/semantics, syntax/phonology, syntax/ pragmatics, morphology/phonology, phonology/phonetics, phonetics/speech processing, semantics/pragmatics, intonation/discourse structure as well as issues in the way that the systems of grammar involving these interface areas are acquired and deployed in use (including language acquisition, language dysfunction, and language processing). It demonstrates, we hope, that proper understandings of particular linguistic phenomena, languages, language groups, or inter-language variations all require reference to interfaces.

The series is open to work by linguists of all theoretical persuasions and schools of thought. A main requirement is that authors should write so as to understood by colleagues in related sub fields of linguistics and by scholars in cognate disciplines.

In this volume, Chris Barker and Pauline Jacobson have brought together a focussed collection on the syntax-semantics interface. The issue under consideration is architectural: what are the implications of the idea that the syntactic and semantic systems work in tandem (Direct Compositionality)? Barker and Jacobson argue in their introduction to the volume that Direct Compositionality places strong constraints on the syntax semantics interface, and the following chapters explore this in detail, bringing into play both the validity of theoretical assumptions and the force of empirical challenges.

David Adger Hagit Borer . . .

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