The Trinity and the Kingdom: The Doctrine of God

The Trinity and the Kingdom: The Doctrine of God

The Trinity and the Kingdom: The Doctrine of God

The Trinity and the Kingdom: The Doctrine of God

Synopsis

"An excellent introduction to the prophets and the prophetic literature... The goal of the book is to understand the thought of the prophets in their historical contexts, and to communicate that understanding for our time. Its approach, while innovative, builds upon he best of contemporary analysis of the prophetic literature." --Gene M. Tucker Candler School of Theology Emory University

"Koch's first volume on the prophets of ancient Israel displays his sound and creative scholarship and will fill a bibliographical gap. He displays the individuality of each prophet with perceptive insight, but he also compares and interrelates them in his various summaries. Furthermore, Koch relates his study of individual prophets to theological currents that have been flowing through the scholarly world in recent decades." --Bernhard W. Anderson Princeton Theological Seminary

Excerpt

Even while I was still working on The Church in the Power of the Spirit (1975), I realized that I would not be able to continue using the method 'the whole of theology in a single focus'. Always using the same method leads to rigidity on the part of the author and to weariness in the reader. It also became clear to me between 1975 and 1980 that I personally could not authentically frame a 'theology in context' and a 'theology in movement' (liberation theology, black theology, feminist theology), for I am not living in the Third World, am not oppressed and am not a woman. In those years I tried as best I could to let the voices of silenced men and women be heard in my world too—the world in which I myself live. I initiated translations and provided them with commendatory prefaces. I wrote essays supporting liberation theology and feminist theology, African theology and Korean Minjung theology. But all this did not blind me to the fact that my life and my context are not theirs. So for my own work, I entered into a certain self–critical disengagement and began to write my 'systematic contributions to theology'.

As I did so, I also changed my method of procedure. I no longer presented the whole of theology in a single focus but now viewed my 'whole' as a part belonging to a wider community, and as my contribution to theology as a whole. I know and accept the limits of my own existence and my own context. I do not claim to say everything, as earlier dogmatic and systematic theologians once did, in their summas and systems. What I should like to do, however, is to participate in the great theological dialogue with theologians of the past and the present. I am trying to formulate my own contributions while listening to the voices of patristic . . .

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