Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States

Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States

Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States

Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States

Excerpt

The involvement of indigenous peoples in archaeology is on the rise, despite a stormy political past and, sometimes, present. Case studies are increasingly reported in the Americas, Australia, and elsewhere (see Davidson et al. 1995; Harrison and Williamson 2004; Smith and Wobst 2005). In North America, as argued by Watkins (2003:27S), American Indians and First Nations of Canada have frequently opposed archaeologists over who should control research designs and research questions, the interpretation of the indigenous past, and the representation of past cultures in the present. Before 1990 in the United States, Native mistrust and scorn of archaeologists and archaeology were both deep and rampant, largely due to the excavation of Native American skeletal remains and burial objects, and the retention and display of these materials in museums (see Biolsi and Zimmerman 1997; Bray 2001; Fine-Dare 2002; Mihesuah 2000). During these years, “as a rule, American Indians tend[ed] to equate archaeologists with pot hunters, grave looters, or even worse, animals who feast off of the dead” (Watkins 2000a:21).

While this perception may still continue among some, Native Americans are increasingly collaborating with archaeologists and even doing archaeology themselves on (and off) tribal lands (see Stapp and Burney 2002) . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.