Modernism: The Creation of Nation States

Modernism: The Creation of Nation States

Modernism: The Creation of Nation States

Modernism: The Creation of Nation States

Excerpt

The present double volume is the third one of the series entitled Discourses of Collective Identity in Central and Southeast Europe (1770–1945): Texts and Commentaries. The history of this venture goes back to the meeting of a group of young scholars at the Balkan Summer University in Plovdiv in 1999. Step by step, a research project, hosted by the Center for Advanced Study Sofia, was formed with the intention of bringing together and making accessible basic texts of the respective national traditions. The ensuing 'Reader' was envisioned as a challenge to the self-centered and 'isolationist' historical narratives and educational canons prevalent in the region. On the whole, the 'Reader' is expected to fill in the lacunae concerning the knowledge of Central and Southeast Europe pertinent to the very core of the schooling process and academic socialization in these countries. It is hoped that our project will broaden the field of possible comparisons and make researchers look at the process of nation-building in Central and Southeast Europe from a comparative perspective.

The grouping of the texts follows neither the national provenience, nor stricto sensu chronological order. It is determined more by thematic similarities and resonances. The four 'meta-themes/periods,' around which the volumes are organized, are the following: Late Enlightenment (the emergence of the modern 'National Idea'); National Romanticism (the formation of national movements); Modernism (the full development of national movements and often the creation of national states along with the new formulations of national cultures); and Anti-Modernism (concentrating mainly on the radical ideologies of the inter-war period).

Within these thematic units the project analyzes various aspects of identity-formation, such as 'symbolic geography', the symbolic representation of the national community, images of the past and the production of cultural markers (i.e., national language or national character), as well as the images of the other and the 'construction' of identity in religious and socio-cultural contexts – domains that themselves exhibit revealing similarities.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.