Success and Failure of Microbusiness Owners in Africa: A Psychological Approach

Success and Failure of Microbusiness Owners in Africa: A Psychological Approach

Success and Failure of Microbusiness Owners in Africa: A Psychological Approach

Success and Failure of Microbusiness Owners in Africa: A Psychological Approach

Synopsis

Frese and his contributors have studied small businesses in four African countries from a psychological perspective--the first time this has been done--and report that it's the psychological aspects of their strategies, not just the strategies themselves, that contribute significantly to their success. They also prove that many of the stereotypes that seem to characterize the owners of microbusinesses are clearly incorrect. Executives, analysts, bankers, international entrepreneurs, and their academic colleagues will discover that many of the conclusions they have drawn from previous studies can not be generalized. Only by separating those that can be generalized from those that can not, can we get a true understanding of the small business entrepreneurial dynamic.

Excerpt

Michael Frese and Mechlien de Kruif

This introductory chapter has the following purposes: First, we will summarize the relevant literature. This is not a complete overview of the literature, but rather a selective account. the literature is wide, multidisciplinary, and often hard to find because it is distributed widely across different journals and books in various languages (a more comprehensive literature review on the Western literature is provided in Rauch & Frese, 2000). Second, we want to present a theoretical framework that allows the study of psychological variables within the area of entrepreneurship. Third, we would like to convince the reader that psychological concepts are important for the study of entrepreneurial success (we take up this issue again in Chapter 9).

Why study psychological factors of
entrepreneurial success in AFRICA?

Micro- and small-scale enterprise owners are important contributors to the economies of developing countries. While it has been shown in Western countries that small-scale entrepreneurs are an important force for economic development, innovation, and flexibility, they are even more important in developing countries. Without the contribu-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.