Nursing Home Ethics: Everyday Issues Affecting Residents with Dementia

Nursing Home Ethics: Everyday Issues Affecting Residents with Dementia

Nursing Home Ethics: Everyday Issues Affecting Residents with Dementia

Nursing Home Ethics: Everyday Issues Affecting Residents with Dementia

Synopsis

"The author sets the stage by exploring the pre-nursing home experiences of families living with dementia and, in contrast, how residents and family members experience life in the nursing home. The following chapters contain detailed hypothetical cases that include questions, possible actions, and insightful commentary to illustrate practical approaches to understanding ethical everyday issues affecting nursing home residents. The book also contains a useful Appendix focusing on creating a Nursing Home Ethics Committee." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The perspective advanced by this book is that living with and caring for persons with dementia in an institutional setting can be seen as an exercise in everyday ethics. Although primarily written for those who work in nursing homes and for educators and students in the field of gerontology, its content is presented in a way that can be appreciated by others as well. The writer invites this. In particular, the first two chapters on living with dementia and the nursing home experience may be of interest to a broader readership (such as laypersons or beginning level students and professionals). Chapter 3, on ethics in action, is more tailored to the needs of professionals. But, from this point on, families of persons with dementia might be interested in and consoled by descriptions of approaches that could be taken by a nursing home to understand residents' behavior and arrive at comfortable solutions. In addition, the practice cases in Chapter 4 are written intentionally at a general public reading level so that they may be used to meet in-service learning needs of certified nursing assistants and other nursing home personnel.

This book takes up where The 36-Hour Day (Mace & Rabins, 3rd ed., 1999) leaves off. The 36-Hour Day, although primarily written as a guide for laypersons and families caring for persons with dementia at home, is an invaluable resource to any individual whose personal interest, life circumstances, or professional commitment involves a desire to be as well-informed as possible in this area. These individuals include, for example, professional care-providers and educators who also may find its approaches to common issues and its understanding of the needs of both care-receivers and caregivers helpful. Nursing Home Ethics begins with the at-home experiences of persons with dementia that The 36Hour Day explores in greater detail. However, it uses these experiences differently to appreciate how families try to sustain togetherness and to understand how they may come to the decision to pursue institutionalization. It then moves on to explore how approaches to previously encountered care issues (as told from the perspectives of residents . . .

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