Emergency Relief Operations

Emergency Relief Operations

Emergency Relief Operations

Emergency Relief Operations

Synopsis

An essential companion to Basics of Humanitarian Missions, the first volume in this series, this book is a practical guide to planning and managing relief operations in a range of specific emergency settings. The eleven chapters - each written by a leading professional - describe solutions to political, military, diplomatic, medical, and organizational challenges facing humanitarian operations. Designed for students, teachers, practitioners, policy-makers, journalists, and other professionals, Emergency Relief Operations provides detailed case studies and tested strategies applicable to both natural and man-made crises - from floods and earthquakes to medical emergencies, civil strife, and forced migration.

Excerpt

Kevin M. Cahill, M.D.

EMERGENCY RELIEF operations are the starting point for most international humanitarian assistance programs. Wanton killing and brutality within supposedly sovereign borders, ethnic and religious strife, millions of near-starving refugees, other millions of migrants fleeing their homes out of fear for their lives, human rights trampled down, appalling poverty in the shadows of extraordinary wealth, inhumanity on an incredible scale in what was supposed to be a peaceful dawn following the Cold War— these are the awesome challenges that face the world community and are quite different from the nation state rivalries and alliances that preoccupied statesmen during most of the last century. More and more, these humanitarian crises are immediately known to us in an era of instant communications, demand a response, and, as is pointed out in the companion volume, Basics of International Humanitarian Missions, that response, to be effective, cannot be mere compassion or sympathy but must reflect an emerging science and the strengths of multiple partners.

The desire to respond to natural or man-made disasters is strong in every culture and on every continent. However, as the contributors to these books point out, the disasters of today are more complex and more dangerous than ever before, and an effective and well-coordinated response must be multidisciplinary. Some areas of the world, for historical, ethnic, and political reasons, are disaster prone. Complex humanitarian crises, sadly, have become a common interface between developed and developing nations, between rich and poor, the haves and the have nots. Those of us privileged to participate in great humanitarian . . .

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