Military Training and Children in Armed Conflict: Law, Policy, and Practice

Military Training and Children in Armed Conflict: Law, Policy, and Practice

Military Training and Children in Armed Conflict: Law, Policy, and Practice

Military Training and Children in Armed Conflict: Law, Policy, and Practice

Synopsis

During recent armed conflicts such as those in Iraq, the former Yugoslavia, and Rwanda public attention was repeatedly caught by images of children, both as civilians and as soldiers. Those conflicts, like so many others, were vivid reminders that where there is armed conflict there are also, almost always, children. Soldiers and officers fulfil many roles in relation to such children sometimes as combatants, sometimes as humanitarian workers, sometimes as protectors, and/or sometimes as enemies and abusers. This book aims to address three main questions: what are the obligations of officers of national armed forces in relation to children, either civilians or combatants, whom they or those under their command may encounter while participating in situations of armed conflict? How realistic and achievable are these obligations? How can compliance with them be encouraged, monitored, and/or enforced? The book examines these questions in the context of military training. In doing so, it has another inextricably linked aim: to see if there are ways in which the training of officers can improve the protection of children in armed conflict situations, in accordance with international law and policy. It is intended for use particularly by those involved in training of national armed forces, including officers themselves, and members of governments, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and inter-governmental organisations. It is hoped that it will also be of interest to lawyers, academics and others concerned with child rights and related law and policy. It contains examples of actual training materials that can be modified for use in different countries and contexts.

Excerpt

The title of this book is self-explanatory: it is, broadly, about military training concerning children in armed conflict. It is also a book that explicitly attempts to link theory with practice—and it addresses a topic that engages a range of different organisations and individuals.

The book is therefore intended to be read and used by those involved in the training of national armed forces, including military personnel, government representatives and policy-makers, and members of non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations. It is hoped that it will also be of interest to academics, lawyers and others concerned with 'child rights' and related law and policy more generally.

Accordingly, the book is structured for ease of reference by these various categories of reader, so that it can accommodate those with specialised interests who may wish to read only some chapters, or indeed some sections of some chapters. For those concerned only with the main child-related rules pertinent to military training, these rules are highlighted in the text, marked with *, and they are also summarised as self-contained training notes in Appendix Six. For other specialised readers, there follows a brief guide to the ten chapters, highlighting areas that may be of interest.

Chapter One (Introduction)—the final section, particularly the 'Definitions' and 'Outline': relevant for all readers;

Chapters Two-Five (Law and Policy: Content of Rules Relevant to Officer Training): particularly relevant for those involved in military training (eg, officers and other military personnel, government representatives and representatives of international organisations);

Chapter Six (Law and Policy: Obligations of Governments): particularly relevant for members of governments, policy-makers, representatives of international organisations and others engaged in dialogue with states concerning child-specific military training;

Chapter Seven (Impact of Law and Policy): particularly relevant for those involved in military training (as above, Chapters Two—Five). However, it is likely that experienced trainers will already be familiar with this material;

Chapters Eight-Nine (Country Studies and the ICRC): relevant for general readership—those with an interest in military training practice 'on the ground';

Chapter Ten (Conclusion): relevant for all readers.

The Appendices (One to Six) supplement the text, and readers will be referred to the pertinent Appendix by information set out in the related chapters. Appendices Five . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.