History of Delaware

History of Delaware

History of Delaware

History of Delaware

Synopsis

"Originally undertaken by the author as a Bicentennial project in 1975, and now the standard history of the state, this volume chronicles the history of Delaware from the early 1600s to the present." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

For more than four decades students have been handicapped for want of a one-volume history of Delaware. Walter A. Powell's History of Delaware, published in 1928, has been out of print for more than four decades. Its place was filled for many years by a splendid book prepared by the Federal Writers' Project entitled Delaware: A Guide to the First State, originally published in 1938 and reprinted with minor revisions in 1948 and 1955. In this work an introductory section of over 150 pages included chapters on history, government, transportation, religion, agriculture, and so forth, that were generally an improvement on Powell's work, thanks to the competence of Jeannette Eckman, Anthony Higgins, and William Conner, who were editors of this guide.

Still, it was not primarily a history and made no effort to present a unified chronological account of the major developments in the history of Delaware. My colleague and teacher, H. Clay Reed, talked with me at various times of our eventually collaborating on a one-volume work when we were free of other pressing commitments, but, unfortunately, that time had not yet come when Professor Reed died in 1973. Meanwhile, he had edited a two-volume cooperative work, Delaware: A History of the First State, in 1947 (a third volume, entirely biographical, does not bear his name), and I had written a short (thirty-fourpage) history of Delaware for a series of Students' Guides to Localized History issued by Teachers College Press of Columbia University and edited by Clifford L. Lord.

In the fall of 1974 I was approached by some members of the Delaware American Revolutionary Bicentennial Commission with the suggestion that I undertake to expand this brief sketch as a Bicentennial project. When I seemed receptive but pleaded the problem of time, the commissioners quickly arranged a year's leave of absence for me in the calendar year 1975, with . . .

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