Music in Terezain

Music in Terezain

Music in Terezain

Music in Terezain

Excerpt

On a dismal day, October 16, 1944, a freight train moved lazily from Terezín to an unknown destination somewhere in the East. Perhaps the sun was shining brightly, but it was dismal inside the cattle cars filled with a strange cargo. This was a normal sort of day, especially in the few weeks between September 28 and October 28 of that year, with a number of similar trains heading in the same direction, always with the same purpose: to transport thousands of prisoners from the “anteroom to hell” to the real hell in Auschwitz, thousands upon thousands of people whose only “crime” was that they were born of Jewish parents.

Suddenly a piece of paper appeared in the air alongside the train, gliding slowly to the ground. A postcard with a terse message had been dropped from the cattle car with the hope that some bystander would put a stamp on it and mail it. And somebody did.

A few days later the postcard reached its destination. It expressed concern about several people:

When referring to the concentration camp, the German name, Auschwitz, will be
used, rather than the Polish name, Ośwíęcim, to indicate the Nazi involvement and
responsibility.

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