Women in Higher Education: Empowering Change

Women in Higher Education: Empowering Change

Women in Higher Education: Empowering Change

Women in Higher Education: Empowering Change

Synopsis

More women are receiving advanced degrees and ascending to the ranks of deans, provosts, and presidents, but despite gains in advancing gender equality, efforts at true empowerment are still met with significant resistance within academia. The contributors to this collection are committed to promoting the issue of gender and empowering women in higher education.

Excerpt

Women in higher education have made significant progress over the years in our quest to achieve gender equality. More women are receiving advanced degrees, more women are ascending to the ranks of deans, provosts, and presidents, and ostensibly, institutions of higher learning are increasingly promoting gender and women's studies programs. Regardless of whether we struggle to pursue that quest for equality as undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, or administrators, the struggle to advance the notion of gender and empower women in higher education is borne by all of us. Our ability to create change within higher education should be equally enhanced by the diversity of our academic backgrounds. Even though women have a greater presence in the humanities, education, and social sciences, we are not alien to the disciplines of math and the natural sciences. Despite our gains in advancing gender equality, however, our efforts at true empowerment are still met with significant resistance by the walls that house an academic culture that often remains resistant to gendered voices for change. Despite the fact that women constitute the majority in a numerical sense, women in higher education still remain a relatively unheard minority population when it comes to defining the values, goals, and ever-evolving mission statements of colleges and universities as our institutions attempt to adapt to an increasingly technological world in the delivery of higher education. Even though institutions of higher learning are becoming more responsive to their external environment, they are impaired when it comes to responding to voices of change from within. The declining elite comprised of males of European descent still manage to dominate the university's agenda from both within and without.

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