Nineteenth-Century European Art: A Topical Dictionary

Nineteenth-Century European Art: A Topical Dictionary

Nineteenth-Century European Art: A Topical Dictionary

Nineteenth-Century European Art: A Topical Dictionary

Excerpt

This book is a survey, arranged alphabetically, of the major art movements, works of art (notably in painting and sculpture), art themes, people, and events of the period from 1789 to 1914. Also covered are many of the historical developments within Europe that impinged upon the art community. Each entry on a work of art includes its date and current location, a description of the work, and a discussion of the context in which it was created, including references to significant people and events. Where appropriate, asterisks (*) direct the reader to other entries in the dictionary. After each entry, except where it would be inappropriate, there are examples of the artwork of individual artists, art movements, and themes. In every case an entry on an artist is concluded with an example of her or his artwork. Customarily no examples are included for entries about painting or sculpture, notable geographical sites, political regimes, generalized artistic techniques, or individuals who were not artists. Following these examples and set off with parentheses are sources where the artworks mentioned in the entry can be found. Page numbers are in arabic numbers without a [p] for sources that do not use unique numbers for illustrations. For books that designate distinct numbers (figures) for their examples, [fig.] is used, followed by the arabic number of the illustration. For those sources that list color plates separately but chronologically, [c-pl.] with the arabic number is used. Except where noted, [oil] means oil on canvas when paintings are being discussed. Where more than one book or article by an author is listed in the Bibliography, a key word from the title is used.

I would like to acknowledge the aid of Jeanette Probst, graduate student in the Department of History, Murray State University, for her judicious pursuit of difficult birth and death dates of hard-to-find artists. Ms. Probst was also helpful in the pursuit of the goal of a mistake-free text. Also the tremendous contributions of Ms. Barbara Goodhouse, Ms. Elizabeth . . .

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