Male Order: Unwrapping Masculinity

Male Order: Unwrapping Masculinity

Male Order: Unwrapping Masculinity

Male Order: Unwrapping Masculinity

Synopsis

First published in 1988, this is a collection of articles exploring the meaning of masculinity, work, at home, in politics and in love. Looking at fashion, images of black men, heterosexuality, feminism, the new man and families, it examines some of the growing uncertainties about what it means to be male today.

Excerpt

In this new introduction to Male Order I want to focus on one significant development since 1988: the male reaction against women and liberal sexual politics.

A quick glance at contemporary youth culture would appear to contradict the idea of a male backlash. Dance culture and environmental politics have encouraged a coming together of the sexes after the gender conflicts of the 1970s and 1980s. To prove the point, the 1990s have recycled the 1960s aesthetic of unisex. Young men are lined up with young women in Calvin Klein adverts, wearing the same clothes, sharing the same fragrance. Sky magazine and The Face depict unisex images of wasted, anorexic white youth, hyping the mythologies of an outcast, disenchanted young. On the surface young men and women appear more at ease with each other. There are plenty who believe that the feminist battles for equality are now an unnecessary and divisive adjunct to a more egalitarian gender culture. But these images of young men and women joined together in a gender free androgyny evade the uncertainties and antagonisms which beset them. What unites young men and women is their disenfranchisement from the mainstream of political and economic life. What divides them is the differential effect . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.