Closing the Book on Homework: Enhancing Public Education and Freeing Family Time

Closing the Book on Homework: Enhancing Public Education and Freeing Family Time

Closing the Book on Homework: Enhancing Public Education and Freeing Family Time

Closing the Book on Homework: Enhancing Public Education and Freeing Family Time

Excerpt

When Piscataway, New Jersey, introduced a policy limiting the amount of homework in its public schools, the New York Times treated the event as a major news story. A front-page article detailed the school's policy, the rationale for that policy, and the reactions of parents and children. Other major media quickly followed the Times's lead. For the first time in a generation, homework-both its amount and type-had become a subject of national debate. I was fortunate enough to be part of the debate. A colleague and I had recently published a book advocating limitations on and alternatives to homework. We were pleasantly surprised at the amount of attention our book received, but the opportunity to participate in this debate did more than flatter my ego. It gave me new insights into why homework reform is vital both for its own sake and for its connections to other related family and workplace issues. These insights have suggested some means and strategies for achieving homework and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.