Organ and Tissue Donation: An Evidence Base for Practice

Organ and Tissue Donation: An Evidence Base for Practice

Organ and Tissue Donation: An Evidence Base for Practice

Organ and Tissue Donation: An Evidence Base for Practice

Synopsis

  • What is the historical and social context that shapes our attitudes towards organ and tissue donation?
  • How do the bereavement experiences of organ donor families differ from other types of bereavement?
  • How can health and social care professionals support bereaved families leading up to, during and after organ and tissue donation?
This ground-breaking book is a valuable addition to the end-of-life, palliative and bereavement care literature. Using original research findings relating to the social and psychological issues surrounding organ donation, this book provides a strong evidence-base and brings together contemporary research carried out in the developed world. The book is internationally applicable, especially in countries with Westernised healthcare systems and where organ donation takes place using similar practices to the UK.

Key areas covered include:

  • Examination of the historical development of human dissection and how it created a context for legislation
  • Analysis of how human organ and tissue donation is currently understood
  • The social theories that help explain the donation event and families' and health professionals' experiences of it
Organ and Tissue Donation: An Evidence Base for Practice is essential reading for transplant coordinators and qualified clinical practitioners working in intensive care, accident and emergency departments, operating theatres, palliative care units and bereavement support and counselling services. It is also a core text for specialist postgraduate programmes and a useful reference book for national organisations concerned with donation and transplant services.

Excerpt

This book provides an evidence base for the psychological and social issues that concern families, health professionals and others involved with organ and tissue donation. In most countries worldwide human transplant technology depends on the unconditional donation of organs from the deceased, usually following a sudden and traumatic death. Legislation in some countries (e.g. Human Tissue Act 2004; Dodd-McCue et al. 2006) now gives precedence to the wishes of the deceased, expressed while they were alive. Therefore, families have no right to veto these wishes. However, relatives of potential deceased donors remain a critical link in maintaining organ supply, as organ donation is normally discussed with them and their support for, agreement or lack of an objection sought, before donation takes place. Therefore, at a time of often sudden and unexpected loss, relatives are asked to make or support decisions about organ and tissue donation. Little is known about how these choices are made and what the implications are for the bereaved.

Research has shown that this donation event is couched in a particular psychological and social milieu that transcends and challenges traditional understandings of death, bereavement, gift-giving, decision-making and continuation of life. This book draws together for the first time evidence which informs our understanding of work in the area of donation. The outstanding feature of the book is its strong evidence base of original research, with theoretical perspectives about the social and psychological issues that underpin organ donation.

Who is the book for?

This book is internationally applicable, especially in countries with well resourced and developed health care systems and where organ and tissue donation takes place using similar practices. It will interest a range of individuals concerned with the psychological and social issues that affect this bereaved population. The book is relevant to transplant coordinators and qualified clinical practitioners working in intensive care, accident and emergency, operating theatres, palliative care services, tissue donation services and bereavement counselling services.

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