Reclaiming a Plundered Past: Archaeology and Nation Building in Modern Iraq

Reclaiming a Plundered Past: Archaeology and Nation Building in Modern Iraq

Reclaiming a Plundered Past: Archaeology and Nation Building in Modern Iraq

Reclaiming a Plundered Past: Archaeology and Nation Building in Modern Iraq

Excerpt

During most of 2002 and 2003, Iraq was at the center of world attention and at the heart of an unprecedented international debate. Much of the discussion, prior to the invasion of Iraq in March of 2003, focused on whether or not military action against Iraq was justified. Once the war started the focus shifted toward the execution and strategy of the military campaign and the ensuing loss of human life. By mid-April, however, once it became clear that the government of Saddam Husayn was no longer in power, Iraq's antiquities and museums became part of the war's "collateral damage." For a few days in April, the questions and discussion of wartime strategy, links of Husayn's regime to al-Qaida, and the presence of weapons of mass . . .

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