Can't Eat, Won't Eat: Dietary Difficulties and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Can't Eat, Won't Eat: Dietary Difficulties and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Can't Eat, Won't Eat: Dietary Difficulties and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Can't Eat, Won't Eat: Dietary Difficulties and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Synopsis

"Finding out that your child has Asperger syndrome or autism can be devastating enough, but when you discover that he or she won't eat 99.9 per cent of all food and drink in the known universe, the fun really starts. This was the situation the author found herself in a decade ago when her son first took a dislike to milk, and then to virtually every other substance she attempted to feed him. Her book was written to reassure other parents that there are lots of people out there in the same boat, and to suggest practical methods of dealing with the problem. As well as drawing on her own experience, the author has spoken to parents, children, and professionals with first-hand knowledge of dietary difficulties, and their advice and comments form a key part of the book." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

For most of the population food is a source of comfort, pleasure and security. We actively look forward to mealtimes, promise ourselves culinary treats when the pressure is on and reward ourselves with gourmet meals out on special occasions. This is certainly my experience of food, but my son's view is somewhat different. For him food can be a source of fear, or even revulsion. This has been the case from day one and he's not alone. It's claimed that around 1 in 20 children under the age of 5 have feeding problems (Batchelor and Kerslake 1990), but statistics like this can be a little misleading if they are taken out of context. I believe it's important to look at the unique problems experienced by various subgroups. For example, feeding difficulties seem to be more prevalent in children with developmental disabilities; it's estimated that around one-third will experience this type of problem.

I've written this book for parents of children who have been placed somewhere within that hazy category known as autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). More specifically, for those who have offspring with a real fear or dislike of food, I am not talking about the fussy or faddy eater who is a little picky about food, but the child who has a real aversion to trying anything new and turns every meal into a battle with the inevitable result – Parents Nil: Stroppy Kid One.

My son is now 11 years old and was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome (AS) several years ago. While this diagnosis wasn't a cause for celebration, his hostility towards every meal I placed before him caused me the greatest amount of anguish. Naturally, I wanted to read all I possibly could on the subject, but while there were lots of books on autism in general and Asperger's syndrome in particular, there seemed . . .

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