Putting Voters in Their Place: Geography and Elections in Great Britain

Putting Voters in Their Place: Geography and Elections in Great Britain

Putting Voters in Their Place: Geography and Elections in Great Britain

Putting Voters in Their Place: Geography and Elections in Great Britain

Synopsis

Why do people living in different areas vote in different ways? Why does this change over time? How do people talk about politics with friends and neighbours, and with what effect? Does the geography of well-being influence the geography of party support? Do parties try to talk to all voters at election time, or are they interested only in the views of a small number of voters living in a small number of seats? Is electoral participation in decline, and how does the geography of the vote affect this? How can a party win a majority of seats in Parliament without a majority of votes in the country? Putting Voters in their Place explores these questions by placing the analysis of electoral behaviour into its geographical context. Using information from the latest elections, including the 2005 General Election, the book shows how both voters and parties are affected by, and seek to influence, both national and local forces. Trends are set in the context of the latest research and scholarship on electoral behaviour. The book also reports on new research findings.

Excerpt

Geography and environmental studies are two closely related and burgeoning fields of academic enquiry. Both have grown rapidly over the past few decades. At once catholic in its approach and yet strongly committed to a comprehensive understanding of the world, geography has focused upon the interaction between global and local phenomena. Environmental studies, on the other hand, have shared with the discipline of geography an engagement with different disciplines, addressing wide-ranging and significant environmental issues in the scientific community and the policy community. From the analysis of climate change and physical environmental processes to the cultural dislocations of postmodernism in human geography, these two fields of enquiry have been at the forefront of attempts to comprehend transformations taking place in the world, manifesting themselves as a variety of separate but interrelated spatial scales.

The Oxford Geographical and Environmental Studies series aims to reflect this diversity and engagement. Our goal is to publish the best original research in the two related fields, and, in doing so, to demonstrate the significance of geographical and environmental perspectives for understanding the contemporary world. As a consequence, our scope is deliberately international and ranges widely in terms of topics, approaches, and methodologies. Authors are welcome from all corners of the globe. We hope the series will help to redefine the frontiers of knowledge and build bridges within the fields of geography and environmental studies. We hope also that it will cement links with issues and approaches that have originated outside the strict confines of these disciplines. In doing so, our publications contribute to the frontiers of research and knowledge while representing the fruits of particular and diverse scholarly traditions.

Gordon L. Clark Andrew Goudie Ceri Peach . . .

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