De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi =: The Conquest of Lisbon

De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi =: The Conquest of Lisbon

De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi =: The Conquest of Lisbon

De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi =: The Conquest of Lisbon

Synopsis

Although the Crusades are generally thought of in terms of the European attempt to conquer and colonize the Holy Land, from the twelfth century onward crusading also involved the "reconquest" of the Iberian peninsula from the Muslims. This eyewitness account of the capture of Lisbon in 1147 by the combined forces of King Alfonso Henriques of Portugal and a fleet of crusaders from the Anglo-Norman realm, Flanders, and the Rhineland is one of the richest and most exciting sources to survive from this period. Far more than just a narrative, De expugnatione Lyxbonensi vividly conveys the tensions between the secular and spiritual motives of a crusading army, as well as revealing a wealth of information on medieval warfare, the development of crusading ideology and holy war, and Muslim views of the crusaders.

The new foreword by Jonathan Phillips provides insight to the latest scholarship on the integral place of the Lisbon expedition in the Second Crusade, the identity of the text's author, and his message for crusaders.

Excerpt

Jonathan Phillips Royal Holloway, University of London

It is sixty-four years since Charles Wendell David first published his introduction and text of De expugnatione Lyxbonensi This remarkable work—an eye-witness account of the capture of Lisbon (October 1147) by the combined forces of King Afonso Henriques of Portugal (1128–85) and a fleet of crusaders from the Anglo-Norman realm, Flanders and the Rhineland—is one of the richest and most exciting sources to survive from this period. It provides a vivid description of a key event in the history of the Iberian peninsula and outlines one of the few successes of the Second Crusade (1145–49). But De expugnatione is far more than a narrative: it contains a wealth of information on ideas of crusading and holy war, military organization and siege techniques, and Mushm views of Christianity. It also reveals the tensions in trying to balance the spiritual motives of a crusader army against its needs and desires for secular rewards.

David wrote a lengthy and comprehensive introduction to his work that covered the following points: the Anglo-Norman aristocracy in the early history of the crusades, early crusading enterprises of the maritime populations of England and the Low Countries, and a discussion of the manuscript and the author of the text. Except for the section concerning the identity of the author, the majority of this work remains as scholarly and accurate as when it was first published; and therefore it has been reprinted here, following this foreword. the concerns of this present writer are: first, to locate the conquest of Lisbon within the history of the crusades; second, to place it in the context of the Second Crusade; third, to provide material that was unavailable to David—principally in . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.