Jesus, Humanity and the Trinity: A Brief Systematic Theology

Jesus, Humanity and the Trinity: A Brief Systematic Theology

Jesus, Humanity and the Trinity: A Brief Systematic Theology

Jesus, Humanity and the Trinity: A Brief Systematic Theology

Synopsis

With simplicity and elegance Tanner sketches an historically informed vision of the faith: Chapter 1 recovers strands of early Christian accounts of Jesus and his significance for a very different age. Chapter 2 situates Christology in a religious vision of the whole cosmos, while chapter 3 lays out the ethical and political implications of the vision. Chapter 4 speculates about the "end" of things in Christ. Tanners work was developed from the Scottish Journal of Theology Lectures in 1999 in Edinburgh.

Excerpt

In order to witness to and be a disciple of Jesus, every Christian has to figure out for him or herself what Christianity is all about, what Christianity stands for in the world. Figuring that out is the primary task of systematic theology. Systematic theology offers a vision of the whole, a sense of how to bring together all the elements of Christian involvement into unity around an organizing center or centers. This book is a contribution to such an effort, understood not as a bleak and dry academic exercise, but as an attempt to meet an essential demand of everyday Christian living.

Churchgoing, the confession of one’s faith in Christ before the world, and the intention of living accordingly, are forms of witness and discipleship that, on the face of it, might not seem to require much cogitation of this wide-ranging sort about the nature of one’s Christian commitments. That they do require it becomes clear when one considers how Christian life is made up of countless occasions in which one must decide the acts, beliefs and attitudes that really are in keeping with one’s Christian commitments. Decisions about the political allegiances or economic lifestyles that are appropriate for Christians, about whether to pray in US public schools or pay your taxes or go to war, decisions about the direction of one’s church’s mission to the wider community (how, for example, to divide church coffers between institutional upkeep and service to the poor), decisions about the shape of worship life in the daily round and on contested issues (for example, should children be admitted to the Lord’s table, should non-celibate gays be ministers?)–decisions like these are the stuff of Christian life; they arise continuously and inevitably the more Christianity is a way . . .

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