The Iraq War: A Military History

The Iraq War: A Military History

The Iraq War: A Military History

The Iraq War: A Military History

Synopsis

Two of America's most distinguished military historians go beyond the blaring headlines, embedded videophone reports and Centcom briefings to analyze events in light of past military experience, present battleground realities and future expectations. extensive military expertise, the authors assess the opposing aims of the Coalition forces and the Iraqi regime and explain the day-to-day tactical and logistical decisions of infantry and air command, as British and American troops moved into Basra and Baghdad. They simultaneously step back to examine long-running debates within the US Defense Department about the proper uses of military power and probe the strategic implications of those debates for America's buildup to this war. Surveying the immense changes that have occurred in America's armed forces between the Gulf conflicts of 1991 and 2003 - changes in doctrine as well as weapons - this volume reveals critical meanings and lessons about the new American way of war as it has unfolded in Iraq. volume of the Gulf War Air Power Survey, commissioned after the 1991 conflict in Kuwait. Major General Robert H. Scales, Jr., US Army retired, brings perspective as head of the Army's team of Gulf War historians. He also served as Commandant of the Army War College.

Excerpt

Battles are won by slaughter and maneuver. The greater the gen
eral, the more he contributes in maneuver, the less he demands
in slaughter.

WINSTON CHURCHILL, The World Crisis, 1923

Shortly before 3 a.m. on the morning of January 17, 1991, an American F-117 Nighthawk soared across the skies of the brightly lit city of Baghdad. The stealth aircraft flew too high for Iraqis below to see, and it was undetected by the probing pulses of Iraqi radars. In air defense centers throughout the country, tired technicians peered through clouds of cigarette smoke at empty radar screens. They heard nothing overhead—just the steady background hum of air conditioners. Yet they knew that twenty minutes earlier American helicopters had attacked two radar sites on the border with Saudi Arabia. Both had ceased transmitting. And twelve minutes after that, at 2:51, the Nukhayb Intercept Operations Center . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.