F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Excerpt

[Something in his nature never got over things, never
accepted his sudden rise to fame, because all the steps
weren't there.]

(F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Romantic Egoists, 80)

F. Scott Fitzgerald is one of the key authors of the modern period of American literature (1914–1945). His name stands alongside those of Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, and others as one of the most significant writers and literary personalities of the period.

Fitzgerald achieved success and fame early, becoming a well-known author in his early twenties, but his life was troubled and his death at age forty-four was tragic. He may have been a victim of early wealth and fame as implied in the above quote from his notebooks, or he may have been too self-absorbed to last beyond the indulgent decades of his youth, as noted by Heywood Broun in a 1920 interview with Fitzgerald. Summarizing his impression of the young writer, Broun writes, [Having heard Mr. Fitzgerald, we are not entirely minded to abandon our notion that he is a rather complacent, somewhat pretentious and altogether self-conscious young man] (1920, 5).

Fitzgerald's contributions to American literature and American culture are unarguable. His lifestyle in the 1920s and his novels and short stories shaped and reflected the age. His novel, The Great Gatsby, which some consider the great American novel, has become a national literary treasure.

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