Issues in Therapy with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Clients

Issues in Therapy with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Clients

Issues in Therapy with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Clients

Issues in Therapy with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Clients

Synopsis

Many readers of Pink Therapy (1996 Open University Press) found the affirmative approaches and detailed discussions there of particular concern to lesbian, gay and bisexual clients invaluable. This volume has twelve further areas discussed in clear and informative style by practitioners from their own professional experience and offers guidelines for good practice as well as full references and further resources. With Pink Therapy and Therapeutic Perspectives on Working with Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Clients, from the same editors and publishers, professionals interested in treating clients from these minorities equitable will find a wealth of support, information and guidelines not previously readily available.

Excerpt

I am delighted to write this brief introduction to what promises to be a further valuable addition to the literature on gay affirmative therapy, following the first two volumes in this trilogy. This has been an area previously consistently neglected in the therapeutic literature and often sidelined, misunderstood, or avoided in both therapeutic practice and training. As a result, counsellors and therapists have been misinformed or uninformed: inevitably this has resulted in clients not always receiving a sufficiently sensitive, knowledgeable and respectful response. Prejudices, stereotypes and oppression have been rife both in a wider society and within some 'therapeutic' circles.

This book marks a significant step forward in informing and challenging. It puts firmly on the therapeutic map an area that should have been there long ago. The rapid success of the first volume has demonstrated that the demand for good literature, in what has previously been marginalised and invalidated as supposedly an area of minority interest only, is very considerable. This success reflects the growing awareness among counsellors and therapists, both those who would identify themselves as members of sexual minorities and those who do not, of the need for a greater knowledge base, a greater skill base, and far more awareness of the complexity of issues that can be presented. This volume and the others in this trilogy also succeed in making this complexity of ideas, subjects and material accessible to a wide range of readers working across a variety of helping contexts. It brings together an impressive array of authors representing a range of theoretical approaches and key areas.

The subjects covered in this volume are crucial to effective practice. It offers therapists, counsellors and others insights and information into aspects . . .

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