New Arenas for Community Social Work Practice with Urban Youth: Use of the Arts, Humanities, and Sports

New Arenas for Community Social Work Practice with Urban Youth: Use of the Arts, Humanities, and Sports

New Arenas for Community Social Work Practice with Urban Youth: Use of the Arts, Humanities, and Sports

New Arenas for Community Social Work Practice with Urban Youth: Use of the Arts, Humanities, and Sports

Synopsis

This book urges professionals who work with urban youth to develop or rediscover innovative, capacity-enhancing, community-based approaches for engaging young people in activities that systematically build on their talents and energy. Delgado argues that these interventions must be grounded in the community and conceptualized and implemented by the community in order for the youths to become potential community assets rather than a drain on the family and community.

Excerpt

Much has been written about impending changes in social work practice and education as we approach and enter the next millennium (Abramovitz 1998; Haynes 1998; Witkin 1998). Globalization trends along with dramatic changes in technology, demographics, migration patterns, and economies, have profound implications for any society and any form of practice involving the helping professions. the approach of the twentyfirst century milestone, however, provides professions with an opportunity to pause and examine past approaches, successes, and challenges (Abramovitz 1998; Haynes 1998; Swenson 1998; Witkin 1998). Further, it provides a natural juncture for examining where social work hopes to go in the future, and what kind of changes will be required to take it there. Further, the turn of the century coincides very closely with the century mark for professional social work practice, further lending significance to the next millennium.

A concurrent retrospective and prospective examination will undoubtedly result in much soul-searching and speculation about what strategic moves must be planned in order to increase the relevance of the profession in the future. in addition, it will result in a close examination of currently used practice paradigms and result in a call for new and more “contemporary” and “relevant” paradigms that will result in new approaches to social work education and practice. These new paradigms, however, will also cause a great deal of debate, with resulting tension within the profession concerning what is “best” for the profession, consumers, and society. If these new paradigms impinge on the practice of other helping professions, a debate involving these other professions can be predicted. the fact that social work practice is very broad, although still primarily clinical in nature, makes any form of examination arduous. This entire process is . . .

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