Charles Sanders Peirce: Contributions to "The Nation" - Vol. 3

Charles Sanders Peirce: Contributions to "The Nation" - Vol. 3

Charles Sanders Peirce: Contributions to "The Nation" - Vol. 3

Charles Sanders Peirce: Contributions to "The Nation" - Vol. 3

Excerpt

Charles Sanders Peirce's contributions to The Nation represent not only a valuable gift to philosophy, but also an encyclopedic intellectual time capsule for the latter part of the nineteenth century. It is our goal to make public a second time, in a convenient format, all of the verified Peirce contributions along with those articles that we or other Peirce scholars believe to be his work. So that discussions presented in these materials may be followed to the fullest, relevant items by other authors have also been included. The actual contributions are issued in three separate parts, this volume being the third. This three-part division is not to be construed, however, as reflecting any surmised structure in these writings. It is adopted solely for convenience of publication. A final fourth part is planned that will include indices and appendices for the preceding pages.

The editor of The Nation during most of the period of Peirce's collaboration was Wendell Phillips Garrison. It is clear, on the basis of several sources, that Garrison often cut Peirce's contributions, sometimes chopping off whole paragraphs or rewriting some sections. After 1881, The Nation was acquired by the New York Evening Post. Thereafter, many reviews from The Nation would also be published in The Post. Thus, there are a great many items by Peirce in The Post. It is likely that some of those reviews avoided Garrison's knife. Moreover, there are probably other items by Peirce in The Post not yet discovered. For purposes of the present project, however, we have not undertaken to survey material published in The Post. An investigation into that material is now in progress at the Institute for Studies in Pragmaticism.

In editing these materials, we have followed a strictly chronological sequence. Instead of providing a special identifying number (as Burks did in his bibliography in volume eight of the Collected Papers—the review of Porter, for example, being numbered as . . .

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