Security Sector Reform and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding

Security Sector Reform and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding

Security Sector Reform and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding

Security Sector Reform and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding

Synopsis

Military and police forces play a crucial role in the long-term success of rebuilding efforts in post-conflict societies. Yet, while charged with the long-term task of providing a security environment conducive to rebuilding war-torn societies, internal security structures tend to lack civilian and democratic control, internal cohesion and effectiveness, and public credibility. They must be placed under democratic control and restructured and retrained to become an asset, not a liability, in the long-term peacebuilding process. External actors from other nations, regional organizations, and the United Nations can be of assistance in this process by creating a basic security environment, preventing remnants of armed groups from spoiling the fragile peacebuilding process, and by facilitating reform of the local security sector. This book offers examples and analyses by an international group of academics and practitioners with direct experiences with security sector reform programs."The case studies offer the reader a useful laboratory in which comparisons can be made and observations tested. It will be useful to policymakers interested in understanding the complexity of addressing security sector reform and civil-military relations." - W. Andy Knight, University of Alberta, Canada.

Excerpt

Albrecht Schnabel and Hans-Georg Ehrhart

In post-conflict societies, the remnants of wartime military and security apparatuses pose great risks to internal security: inflated armies with little or no civilian control; irregular and paramilitary forces; an overabundance of arms and ammunition in private and government hands; weak internal security forces; and a lack of trust in and legitimacy of the government's control over police and military forces. Peacekeeping troops from other nations, regional organizations, and the United Nations attempt to support political and economic transition processes and the transition of wartime security systems. Without a secure environment and a security system that ensures security even after the departure of international peace operations, political, economic, and cultural rebuilding are impossible. The latter can take place only in an environment where the local security sector is subjected to a rigorous democratization process, putting the security forces in the service of society's safety, not its destruction, and where both internal and external security forces are contributing constructively to the rebuilding of process.

Reflecting on the experiences and analyses of an international group of academics and practitioners from various educational and professional backgrounds and diverse cultures of analysis and reflection, this book examines the role of local and external actors – with a focus on military forces – in meeting the challenge of sustainable post-conflict security sector reform. Following analyses of the key challenges of security sector reform and the roles particularly of international peace operations in addressing the security needs of post-conflict societies, case studies . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.