The Men of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: A Biographical Roster of the Fifty-One Members and a Composite Diary of Their Activities from All Known Sources

The Men of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: A Biographical Roster of the Fifty-One Members and a Composite Diary of Their Activities from All Known Sources

The Men of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: A Biographical Roster of the Fifty-One Members and a Composite Diary of Their Activities from All Known Sources

The Men of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: A Biographical Roster of the Fifty-One Members and a Composite Diary of Their Activities from All Known Sources

Synopsis

Meriwether Lewis and William Clark did not embark on their epic trek across the continent alone-dozens of men and eventually one woman accompanied them. The towering triumph of the Lewis and Clark expedition is due in no small part to the skill and fortitude of such men as Sgt. Charles Floyd, the only expedition member to die; Sgt. Patrick Gass, who lived until 1870, the last surviving member of the expedition; Sgt. Nathaniel Hale Pryor, husband to an Osage woman; and York, Clark's slave, who was freed after the expedition.

The men who were instrumental to the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition come to life in this volume. Through the aid of a detailed biographical roster and a composite diary of the expedition that highlights the roles and actions of the expedition's members, Charles G. Clarke affords readers precious glimpses of those who have long stood in the shadows of Lewis and Clark. Disagreements and achievements, ailments and addictions, and colorful personalities and daily tasks are all vividly rendered in these pages. The result is an unforgettable portrait of the corps of diverse characters who undertook a remarkable journey across the western half of the continent almost two hundred years ago.

Excerpt

The Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Pacific and return by way of the Missouri River in 1804–1806 was probably the best written and officially documented of all such governmental undertakings. Certainly its captains and several of its members made copious mention in their journals of the daily travels and notable sights encountered along the way. We have complete records of the material and supplies carried, details of the boats and medicines taken, and full reports on the Indians and strange animals and plants discovered. But a complete roster of all the men who set out with the expedition was never made.

the journals as written by various members of the expedition are: Reuben G.
Thwaites, editor, The Original Journals of the Leims and Clark Expedition, also
containing the journal of Sgt Charles Floyd and the journal of Pvt Joseph White
house. Seven volumes. Dodd, Mead & Co., New York, 1904. (Hereafter cited as
Thwaites.)

Milo M. Quaife, editor, The Journals of Captain Meriwether Lewis and Sergeant
John Ordway
, State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, 1916. (Hereafter
cited as Quaife.)

Ernest S. Osgood, editor, The Field Notes of Captain William Clark, 1803–1805,
Yale University Press, New Haven, 1964. (Hereafter cited as Osgood.)
In addition to the two-volume edition (History of the Expedition …) edited
by Nicholas Biddle, and published in Philadelphia in 1814, which is a condensation
of the original journals, with occasional assistance and clarification from George
Shannon (one of the members), there is the reprint of the text:

Elliott Coues, History of the Expedition under the Command of Lewis and Clark.
Four volumes. Francis P. Harper, New York, 1893. This edition is valuable for the
notes of Dr. Coues. (Hereafter cited as Coues, Lewis and Clark.)

Patrick Gass' journal was published in Pittsburgh in 1807 under the title, Journal
of the Voyages and Travels of a Corps of Discovery, under the Command of Captain
Lewis and Captain Clarke.
. . As edited by David McKeehan, Gass' journal is
so polished as to have little value to this study. However in a few cases Gass is
mentioned and he adds to some points which have been incorporated in my "Diary."

Though not properly a journal of the expedition, Donald Jackson, editor, Letters
of the Lewis and Clark Expedition with Related Documents, 1783–1854
, University
of Illinois Press, Urbana, 1962, is a most valuable work, for in it are collected under

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