New Essays in Ecofeminist Literary Criticism

New Essays in Ecofeminist Literary Criticism

New Essays in Ecofeminist Literary Criticism

New Essays in Ecofeminist Literary Criticism

Synopsis

"Ecofeminist activism and scholarship are becoming increasingly conspicuous as women and men resist the waste, injustice, and cultural impoverishment of global capitalism while attempting to preserve indigenous lifeways or create new, sustainable ones. In the process, feminist literary and cultural ecocriticism has become more interdisciplinary, multicultural, and international. The present volume gathers new essays in ecofeminist literary criticism and theory that extend this critical trajectory for ecocriticism in the context of social eco-feminist theory and practice." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

ECOFEMINISTS are sometimes unfairly caricatured as bourgeois and apolitical—wannabe goddesses who, running with wolves and hugging the trees, fiddle while Rome burns. This special issue of the Bucknell Review joins a stream of recent work that punctures that stereotype, gathering new essays in literary criticism informed by social ecofeminist perspectives. In 1991, Karen J. Warren argued that ecological feminism was [less visible but potentially just as important] as such issues as [pollution, deforestation and desertification, ozone destruction, endangerment of species of animals and wildlife, vanishing wildernesses, and energy conservation.] Today, nearly a decade later, ecofeminism has not yet completely fulfilled its political and cultural promises, but it is becoming increasingly conspicuous as women and men resist the waste, injustice, and cultural impoverishment of global capitalism while attempting to preserve indigenous lifeways or create new, sustainable ones. Ecofeminist activism and scholarship alike are flourishing.

Activism proceeds in such diverse arenas as antimilitarism, ecosystem preservation, the greening of urban and suburban spaces, agriculture, health care, occupational safety, environmental justice, anticonsumerism, animal rights, ethical vegetarianism, and spirituality, while ecofeminists bring new insights to bear in the ongoing, traditional feminist struggles against poverty and sexual and racial violence, to secure the health, dignity, and security of all human beings. Though much ecofeminist activism takes place at the grassroots level, ecofeminist presence can also be detected in large-scale, international venues. In 1992, for example, the Women's World Congress for a Healthy Planet published [Agenda 21,] articulating important environmental goals, and in 1995, the Beijing Fourth World Conference on Women affirmed the projects of environmental protection and social justice, asserting that development should be both [people-centered] (rather than corporate-centered) and [sustainable.]

Ecofeminist scholarship is flourishing, too. The field's bibliography reveals youthful vigor as it grows by leaps and bounds. Leading feminist journals, including Hypatia (1991), Women's Studies (1996) . . .

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