Crime and Social Control in a Changing China

Crime and Social Control in a Changing China

Crime and Social Control in a Changing China

Crime and Social Control in a Changing China

Synopsis

Presenting articles by both Chinese and American scholars, this edited volume promotes a more accurate and in-depth understanding of crime and social control in China. The editors contend that as the economic system has been transformed, many other social institutions in China have also experienced unprecedented changes. Focusing on crime in China, the essays summarize the major structural changes in Chinese society and their effects on crime and justice over the last ten to fifteen years. The volume also offers an overview of Chinese perspectives on crime, examines socio-economic changes and their impact on social control, and discusses changes in adults' and children's courts and the new changes in Chinese policing in Chinese society.

Excerpt

Interest in the comparative study of crime and justice has grown steadily in recent decades. the theme of the 1995 annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology was [Crime and Justice: National and International.] the selection of this theme indicates a common awareness that criminology is an international enterprise. in her presidential address to the annual meeting, Freda Adler identified the benefits derived from comparative study. She observed that we can learn valuable lessons about social control from developments in other countries. As a practical matter, it is particularly important to learn [from each other's experiences in order that costly mistakes are not repeated and that useful practices are replicated] (Adler 1996, p. 4). Moreover, in academe, [globalization affords us the opportunity to do cross-cultural testing and development of criminological theory] (Adler 1996, p. 5).

Although some scholars are engaged in international efforts to initiate joint projects, [most of the contacts have been between Western industrialized countries] (Farrington 2000, p. 3). As many Westerners have observed, Chinese society represents a distinct and unique social and cultural system that differs significantly from Western societies. Since the late 1970s and early 1980s, China has opened its [door] and implemented economic reform. This economic reform has brought about immense changes in all aspects of Chinese society. Especially since 1992, the socioeconomic transition has accelerated dramatically. As the economic system has been transformed by the introduction of market dynamics, many other social institutions have also experienced profound changes, including legal institutions and other institutions responsible for social control. the modernization and economic development stimulated by market reforms have created unprecedented . . .

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