The Case Study Guide to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy of Psychosis

The Case Study Guide to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy of Psychosis

The Case Study Guide to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy of Psychosis

The Case Study Guide to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy of Psychosis

Synopsis

This is a practical volume which reflects how treatment programmes can be compatible with the reality of service delivery and mental health provision in an organisational context. It also supports both training and clinical practice by presenting examples of clinical cases to illustrate the assessment, treatment planning and implementation processes of CBT for psychosis. ∗ Based on extensive clinical experience and real life service settings ∗ Deals with the roles of several mental health disciplines, as they combine in the these treatment programmes ∗ Cases from a variety of settings: inpatient, outpatient community ∗ Describes techniques used with the full range of symptoms Part of the Wiley Series in Clinical Psychology

Excerpt

Within the past year, research has confirmed that non-expert community psychiatric nurses can safely and effectively deliver cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) to patients with schizophrenia and their carers (Turkington et al., 2002). It is reasonable to expect that other disciplines within mental health would achieve similarly encouraging results (Turkington & Kingdon, 2000). Such interventions are greatly appreciated by patients and carers, improve job satisfaction for the practitioner and lead to improved insight and coping. It is now contended that case management should be supplemented by such viable, high-quality psychosocial interventions if improved outcomes are to be achieved for patients with schizophrenia (Thornicroft & Susser, 2001). It certainly seems that low case loads alone do not produce such outcomes, as the uk 700 study (Burns et al., 1999) has demonstrated: how the increased time available is spent would appear to be fundamentally, and not unexpectedly, important.

This pathway towards the application of cbt principles to their psychotic patients has been trod by increasing numbers of community mental health team professionals over the last ten years in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and certain European countries. the dissemination of these techniques in other areas has depended upon local initiatives and has often lacked published case material to support enthusiastic practitioners; thus the pressing need for this casebook. cbt is a collaboration between patient and therapist, so to illustrate the variation that can occur, each chapter begins with a description of a mental health professional's own personal development and training in cbt for psychosis. the contributors then describe a case to illustrate certain key principles, which are explained in varying depths. the cases have been carefully chosen to give the early practitioner a good feel for the process of therapy in a variety of different psychotic presentations. a brief introduction to the general techniques is given at the beginning of the book, and it ends with a discussion on training, supervision and implementation issues.

The first case describes the key principles of working with a patient who has a systematised, grandiose delusion which is antipsychotic-resistant. Douglas Turkington, a psychiatrist, stresses the importance of maintaining . . .

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