Diseasing of America: How We Allowed Recovery Zealots and the Treatment Industry to Convince Us We Are out of Control

Diseasing of America: How We Allowed Recovery Zealots and the Treatment Industry to Convince Us We Are out of Control

Diseasing of America: How We Allowed Recovery Zealots and the Treatment Industry to Convince Us We Are out of Control

Diseasing of America: How We Allowed Recovery Zealots and the Treatment Industry to Convince Us We Are out of Control

Synopsis

A Controversial Argument Against the Disease Theory of Addiction Diseasing of America is a powerful and controversial rebuttal to the "addiction as disease model" that many vested interests-including doctors, counselors, psychologists, treatment centers, and twelve-step programs that specialize in addiction treatment-don't want you to read."I found the arguments in Diseasing of America persuasive and carefully documented. While I find current addiction-treatment models helpful, I think it is critical to look at Stanton Peele's work to question our fundamental assumptions and adjust them on the basis of data."-Jennifer P. Schneider, author of Back From Betrayal and Sex, Lies, and Forgiveness, and member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine"A provocative review of the uses and abuses of the disease model in the past three decades. This important book has significantly added to my education and clinical understanding of addiction in my professional practice."-Richard R. Irons, M. D., The Menninger Clinic

Excerpt

Medical schools are finally teaching about alcoholism; Johns Hop
kins will require basic training for all students and clini
cians… . Alcoholism, as a chronic disease, offers “a fantastic
vehicle to teach other concepts,” says Jean Kinney [of Dart
mouth’s Cork Institute]… . William Osier, Kinney remarks,
coined the aphorism that “to know syphilis is to know medicine,”
… . Now, she says, the same can be said of alcoholism.

—“The Neglected Disease in Medical Education,” Science

OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) is apparently rare in the
general population.

—American Psychiatric Association, 1980

The evidence is strong OCD is a common mental disorder that,
like other stigmatized and hidden disorders in the past, may be
ready for discovery and demands for treatment on a large scale.

—National Institute of Mental Health, 1988

IN AMERICA today, we are bombarded with news about drug and alcohol problems. We may ask ourselves, “How did we get here?” Alternatively, we may wonder if these problems are really worse . . .

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