Troy between Greece and Rome: Local Tradition and Imperial Power

Troy between Greece and Rome: Local Tradition and Imperial Power

Troy between Greece and Rome: Local Tradition and Imperial Power

Troy between Greece and Rome: Local Tradition and Imperial Power

Synopsis

'Erskine refreshingly abandons any notion of the intrinsic significance of the myths... the antiquarian-minded non-specialist will find much to enjoy in the bizarre local adaptations, and their articulation in a wide variety of archaeological and literary sources... a refreshing demand to think again about how myths, particularly foundation myths, can do their work even against the most obvious demands of both rationality and tradition.' -Matthew Fox, Times Literary Supplement'A detailed and spirited sifting of evidence.' -Peter Stothard, Times Higher Education SupplementThe Trojans were the most famous losers in Greek mythology. Yet according to tradition their descendants went on to found Rome, the most powerful city in the Mediterranean. Andrew Erskine explores the role and meaning of Troy in the changing relationship between Greeks and Romans.

Excerpt

This book is an accident. I had intended to write a book on Greek perceptions of the Romans, but somehow never got beyond the first chapter. Many debts have been incurred along the way. Much of it was written while I was a Humboldt Fellow at the Institut für Alte Geschichte in Munich. I am particularly grateful to my host, Hatto H. Schmitt, not only for his hospitality but also for his willingness to read and discuss my work. I have been lucky that so many have generously given up time to read all or part of the manuscript in its various incarnations, Paul Cartledge, Tim Cornell, Oliver Dany, Peter Derow, Martin Goodman, Dieter Hertel, Michael Lloyd, Keith Sidwell, Theresa Urbainczyk, and the still anonymous referees. Others too have helped with advice and conversation, Kai Brodersen, Tom Harrison, Peter Heslin, Llewelyn Morgan, and Manuel Schulte. My thanks are also due to Manfred Korfmann for giving me a tour of the Troad, to Brian Rose for taking me round Hellenistic Ilion, to Chris Hallett and Bert Smith for showing me the Sebasteion reliefs at Aphrodisias and to Christina Haywood, Ciarán Egan, and David Jennings for providing the maps. In the early stages George Forrest was there with his unerring ability to ask the necessary questions.

Underlying any formal list of acknowledgements are memories and associations, walking to Andechs, espresso coffee, the desks in the Institut für Klassiche Archäologie, West Stow, an invisible billiard-table, numerous Dublin restaurants, Coldharbour Lane, all relevant in some indefinable way.

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