Understanding the Literature of World War II: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Understanding the Literature of World War II: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Understanding the Literature of World War II: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Understanding the Literature of World War II: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Synopsis

"With analysis, factual contextual information, and historical documents, this book provides a detailed, but broad perspective on the most destructive event in history. Along with interviews with literary luminaries that personalize the war and help to make connections between the literature and the actual experiences of those involved, Meredith also provides rare historical documents that enhance the reader's understanding of the military and political strategies of the major forces of the war. Each chapter provides a literary analysis of the most relevant literature for students on the topic of that chapter, followed by a historical overview of the aspect of the war that will aid the student to understand the historical context of the literature. This comprehensive casebook will be valuable for interdisciplinary study of World War II and the literature from that period most frequently taught in high school English and history classes." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

On the morning of 1 September 1939, the German Wehrmacht (Army) invaded Poland and opened the hostilities of what would become the second major war within a twenty-year period. The seeds of World War II had been planted after the end of World War I in the Treaty of Versailles. In this document the victorious Principal Allies (the United States, the British Empire, France, Italy, and Japan) and the Associated Powers (Belgium, Portugal, and Romania) levied strenuous conditions against the defeated German empire. In addition to the onerous financial burden Germany had to carry, the most distasteful aspect of its reparations was the subjugation of millions of outlying German-speaking people to Poland and Czechoslovakia. After having forced Austria into political union in March 1938, Adolf Hitler, during the summers of 1938 and 1939, began bringing the world closer to war over the fate of these Germans in what was known as the Polish Corridor and the Sudetenland. Germany's two other allies, Japan and Italy, had been engaged in militaristic conquest throughout the decade, starting with Japan's invasion of Manchuria in 1931 and Italy's attack on Ethiopia in 1935.

Although World War II ended a full decade before I was born, I have always felt a strong connection to it. I distinctly remember in the 1960s sitting on the spacious front porch of my grandmother's . . .

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