Leaving Home: The Art of Separating from Your Difficult Family

Leaving Home: The Art of Separating from Your Difficult Family

Leaving Home: The Art of Separating from Your Difficult Family

Leaving Home: The Art of Separating from Your Difficult Family

Excerpt

One of the very first patients I worked with was a young athletic trainer who bore a striking resemblance to Robert Redford. At first glance, I couldn't imagine what could be troubling to such a handsome and graceful young fellow, although I was soon convinced that he was indeed in need of my help, as he was plagued by recurring depressions. This surprised me, because his youth and robust appearance gave him an air of confident well-being. However, as he began to describe his life to me, I became convinced that he had every reason to be depressed. He had been raised by cold and uncaring parents who appeared perfectly normal to those outside of the family. His mother kept a clean house and served wellprepared food, but behind closed doors she demonstrated little interest in or emotional attachment to her son. She spent every afternoon watching soap operas, and my patient soon learned not to disturb her when he came home from school. He spent much of his time in his room building plastic models of ships and planes. Similarly, his father appeared on the surface to be a good father, in that he was both dependable and a good provider, yet he was almost completely unresponsive to his son's emotional needs. My . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.