Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents

Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents

Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents

Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents

Synopsis

Among evidence-based therapies for children and adolescents with oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior, parent management training (PMT) is without peer; no other treatment for children has been as thoroughly investigated and as widely applied. Here, Alan E. Kazdin brings together the conceptual and empirical bases underlying PMT with discussions of background, principles, and concepts, supplemented with concrete examples of the ways therapists should interact with parents and children.

The second half of the book is a PMT treatment manual. The manual details the particulars of the therapy: what is done to and by whom, what the therapist should say, and what to expect at each stage of treatment. It also contains handouts, charts, and aides for parents. A companion web site (www.oup.com/pmt) provides additional resources for clinicians.

Excerpt

Do professionals really need another book on psychotherapy for children and adolescents? The genre is already vast. Invariably “new and improved” techniques continue to appear, which is why we already have over 550 forms of therapy in use for children. It is as if inventing another therapy or a slight nuance of an existing treatment is one professional path to academic immortality. The impetus for this book is quite different. Parent management training (PMT) has rather special status as a form of psychotherapy or psychosocial intervention for clinical problems. In the context of child and adolescent psychotherapy, there is probably no other treatment with such strong evidence in its behalf. That alone would distinguish the treatment and lobby for its presentation. However, the importance of the focus is heightened by the ironic situation that PMT is rarely taught, discussed, or even mentioned in clinical training of child psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, school counselors, social workers, and psychiatric nurses. Thus, the people who provide direct services to children and adolescents rarely have opportunities to learn about this treatment, leaving aside formal supervised training that would develop the ability to administer the treatment in practice. Impetus for this book derives from the need to provide information about the treatment, its underpinnings, and concrete application in therapy.

Scholarly reviews of the research on PMT are widely available in journal articles and book chapters. In addition, treatment manuals and some self-help books for parents are available describing features of the intervention. There is a void between these two types of publications and in an effort toward their integration. This book is designed to redress this void by covering theory, research, and practice of PMT in a way that is clinically friendly and usable.

The book is presented in two integrated sections. The first section provides the background, principles, and concepts underlying PMT. This section highlights the key principles on which PMT is based and the techniques that derive from them. In addition, research on PMT is highlighted to support the claim that this is a well-studied intervention, to convey what we understand about how PMT works, and to identify what can be done to enhance the effects . . .

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