Fallen Blue Knights: Controlling Police Corruption

Fallen Blue Knights: Controlling Police Corruption

Fallen Blue Knights: Controlling Police Corruption

Fallen Blue Knights: Controlling Police Corruption

Synopsis

Despite its suspected prevalence, no comprehensive analysis of police corruption has been published for nearly three decades. Fallen Blue Knights provides a systematic, in-depth analysis of the subject, while also addressing the question of what can be done to ensure successful corruption control. Kutnjak Ivkovic argues that the current mechanisms for control--the courts, prosecutors, independent commissions, and the media, as well as the internal control mechanisms within a police agency itself--suffer from severe shortcomings that substantially limit their effectiveness. In this much-needed analysis, Kutnjak Ivkovic redefines the roles of major players and develops a novel, comprehensive model of corruption control.

Excerpt

We entrust police officers with the right to use coercive force when needed, and we expect them to enforce the law. Yet some officers abuse this trust and become notorious law violators themselves: They steal. They accept bribes. They rob drug dealers. They sell drugs. They turn a blind eye when they see other police officers stealing or otherwise violating the laws.

The picture of police officers abusing their office for personal gain is itself disturbing, but the problem of police corruption extends well beyond the rule-violating behavior of a few officers. Police corruption distorts police work, encourages the code of silence, promotes resistance to accountability, and undermines the legitimacy of the police and the government.

To ameliorate the effects of police corruption, society has built an elaborate system of control involving multiple entities. Police agencies are assigned the task of preventing corruption, as well as investigating and punishing their own for corrupt behavior. State and federal attorneys are expected to investigate and prosecute corrupt officers, and courts try and sentence them. Mayors, city managers, and other government officials may hold police chiefs accountable. Independent commissions, once formed, are assigned the tasks of investigating the extent of corruption in police agencies, determining . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.