Pilgrimage of Love: Moltmann on the Trinity and Christian Life

Pilgrimage of Love: Moltmann on the Trinity and Christian Life

Pilgrimage of Love: Moltmann on the Trinity and Christian Life

Pilgrimage of Love: Moltmann on the Trinity and Christian Life

Synopsis

InPilgrimage of LoveJoy Ann McDougall offers an original reading and critical analysis of German Protestant theologian Jrgen Moltmann's social trinitarian theology. She identifies the driving theological impulses, methodological convictions, and practical concerns that shape the author's evolving trinitarian vision. She uncovers the narrative of divine love in Moltmann's early trilogy and shows how its conceptual trajectory shifts and deepens in his six-volumeSystematic Contributions to Theology. Building on her analysis, McDougall advances a compelling case for the concept of trinitarian fellowship as the structuring theological principle in Moltmann's later work. She demonstrates how this concept of divine love unifies the author's theological anthropology, theology of grace, and the practices of the life of faith. Finally, she shows how this "social trinitarian analogy of fellowship" serves as an elastic rule of faith in the personal, political, and ecclesial realms of human existence. While McDougall highlights the prophetic potential of Moltmann's trinitarian theology for Christian praxis, she also challenges the author's underdeveloped doctrine of sin and theory of theological language. Pilgrimage of Loveoffers one of the first comprehensive interpretations of Moltmann's mature trinitarian theology. It introduces, systematizes, and clarifies the thought of one of the most significant Protestant theologians at the turn of the twenty-first century. This study will be an invaluable resource on Moltmann's thought for scholars of modern Protestant theology, and for all those interested in the current renaissance of trinitarian theology.

Excerpt

This book began as a dissertation that was completed several years ago at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago. Since that time this project has seen several new additions and been through significant reconstruction. Throughout this arduous process I owe my heartfelt thanks to those colleagues, friends, and family who have accompanied me along the way.

Let me express my deep appreciation first to Bernard McGinn and David Tracy for their collaborative directorship of my dissertation and their ecumenical spirit in reaching across the confessional and the historical boundaries of their disciplines to support my research in contemporary Protestant theology. I owe a special word of gratitude to Bernie for nominating this project to the American Academy of Religion Series at Oxford University Press and for his unfailing support during the revision of the original manuscript. Here, too, my thanks go to Kim Connor and Jim Wetzel, the editors of the AAR series, for their enthusiastic recommendation of this project for the Reflection and Theory in the Study of Religion Series, and to my editor Cynthia Read at Oxford University Press for her careful shepherding of a first-time author through the twists and turns of the publishing process. Special thanks go as well to my research assistant, Gina Weiser, not only for her meticulous copyediting of the final manuscript but also for her artistry in refining its prose.

I owe much gratitude to Jürgen Moltmann for inspiring this project during his unforgettable final teaching semester in Tübingen in 1992, and then for supporting my research during the academic year of 1994–95, a year that was made possible through a dissertation grant from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst. Jür-

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