A New Promised Land: A History of Jews in America

A New Promised Land: A History of Jews in America

A New Promised Land: A History of Jews in America

A New Promised Land: A History of Jews in America

Synopsis

"An excellent Afikoman gift for the teen or young adult at the seder... Diner...writes in a clear style that pulls together that diverse entity known as the American Jewish community."--The Chicago Jewish Star
An engaging chronicle of Jewish life in the United States,A New Promised Landreconstructs the multifaceted background and very American adaptations of this religious group, from the arrival of twenty-three Jews in the New World in 1654, through the development of the Orthodox, conservative, and Reform movements, to the ordination of Sally Priesand as the first woman rabbi in the United States.
Hasia Diner supplies fascinating details about Jewish religious traditions, holidays, and sacred texts. In addition, she relates the history of the Jewish religious, political, and intellectual institutions in the United States, and addresses some of the biggest issues facing Jewish Americans today, including their increasingly complex relationship with Israel.

Excerpt

Since 1654, when twenty-three Jewish women and men landed in New Amsterdam, the history of the Jews and the history of America have been interconnected. The band of newcomers had actually not intended to go to North America. Circumstances took them there. But ever since that date, Jews around the world, Europe in particular, have viewed America as a destination quite unlike any other.

Jews interacted with America in different ways than other immigrants. As the first group of non-Christians to come, they stood out. Because of the situations they left, they could not go back. They had to adapt successfully. And because they came in constant waves of immigration over more than three centuries, they constantly learned and taught each other how to adapt to the new environment. They had to adjust some of the demands of Judaism, an ancient tradition, to American values. For example, in traditional Jewish religion and culture, Jews lived apart from other people and thought of themselves as separate in all social and cultural matters. But America celebrated individualism . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.