Your Name Is Renée: Ruth Kapp Hartz's Story as a Hidden Child in Nazi-Occupied France

Your Name Is Renée: Ruth Kapp Hartz's Story as a Hidden Child in Nazi-Occupied France

Your Name Is Renée: Ruth Kapp Hartz's Story as a Hidden Child in Nazi-Occupied France

Your Name Is Renée: Ruth Kapp Hartz's Story as a Hidden Child in Nazi-Occupied France

Synopsis

In Nazi-occupied France in 1941, four-year-old Ruth Kapp learns that it is dangerous to use her own name. "Remember," her older cousin Jeannette warns her, "your name is Renee and you are French!"
A deeply personal book, this true story recounts the chilling experiences of a young Jewish girl during the Holocaust. The Kapp family flees one home after another, helped by simple, ordinary people from the French countryside who risk their lives to protect them. Eventually the family is forced to separate, and young Ruth survives the war in an orphanage where she is not allowed to see or even mention her parents. Without the trappings of lofty language or the faceless perspective of history, this first-person account poignantly recreates the terror of war seen through the eyes of an innocent child. Your Name Is Reneeis a tale of suffering and redemption, fear and hope, which is bound to stir even the most hardened heart.

Excerpt

In June of 1940, at the time of the French defeat, approximately 320,000 Jews were living in France. Four years later, after the liberation, one fourth had perished. Of these, 76,000 had been deported; 3,000 were sent to French camps; and 1,000 were executed. Half of those 320,000 were French; many were naturalized citizens. The other half were foreigners. Some had entered France in the twenties, after the bloodshed of the First World War, when the country was in need of workers. Others were refugees fleeing Germany's Hitler or Austria's Anschluss. These German and Austrian Jewish refugees were most at risk of persecution.

On September 2, 1939, at the start of the war, men from each region of the country—those whom France chose to consider as “nationals from an enemy state”— were interned in camps. Women regarded as suspect were concentrated in the south, at the camp of Rieucros in Lozère. In May of 1940, when the Germans invaded France, many more women and their children were arrested, and most were directed to the camp of Gurs in the . . .

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