New Roots in America's Sacred Ground: Religion, Race, and Ethnicity in Indian America

New Roots in America's Sacred Ground: Religion, Race, and Ethnicity in Indian America

New Roots in America's Sacred Ground: Religion, Race, and Ethnicity in Indian America

New Roots in America's Sacred Ground: Religion, Race, and Ethnicity in Indian America

Synopsis

"A ground-breaking contribution on the racialization of religion.... An essential book in the study of Indian Americans, second-generation immigrants, and Asian American religions."-Paul Spickard, coauthor of Colorism in Asian America "A detailed analysis of second-generation Indian Americans and identity, New Roots provides a stimulating and lucid argument about the integral role religion and religious oppression play in race and ethnicity in the United States." --Jigna Desai, associate professor of women's studies, University of Minnesota "This beautifully crafted and admirably empathetic study rightly fixes its gaze not on abstract collections of beliefs and practices but on the actual lives of specific Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims. Along the way, it teaches us much about race and religion in American life." --Stephen Prothero, chair, department of religion, Boston University In this compelling look at second-generation Indian Americans, Khyati Y. Joshi draws on case studies and interviews with forty-one second-generation Indian Americans, analyzing their experiences involving religion, race, and ethnicity from elementary school to adulthood. As she maps the crossroads they encounter as they navigate between their homes and the wider American milieu, Joshi shows how their identities have developed differently from their parents' and their non-Indian peers' and how religion often exerted a dramatic effect. The experiences of Joshi's research participants reveal how race and religion interact, intersect, and affect each other in a society where Christianity and whiteness are the norm. Joshi shows how religion is racialized for Indian Americans and offers important insights in the wake of 9/11 and the backlash against Americans who look Middle Eastern and South Asian. Through her candid insights into the internal conflicts contemporary Indian Americans face and the religious and racial discrimination they encounter, Joshi provides a timely window into the ways that race, religion, and ethnicity interact in day-to-day life. Khyati Y. Joshi is an assistant professor at the School of Education at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey.
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