The Christological Controversy

The Christological Controversy

The Christological Controversy

The Christological Controversy

Synopsis

This book is a collection of texts designed to illustrate the development of Christian thought about the person of Christ in the era of the church fathers. The earliest text translated comes from the latter half of the second century, when the ideas and problems which were to dominate christological thought in this period were first crystallized. The latest is the well-known 'Definition of the Faith' of the Council of Chalcedon (A. D. 451), which has generally been accepted as defining the limits of christological orthodoxy.

Excerpt

This book is a collection of texts designed to illustrate the development of Christian thought about the person of Christ in the era of the church fathers. the earliest text translated comes from the latter half of the second century, when the ideas and problems which were to dominate christological thought in this period were first crystallized. the latest is the well-known [Definition of the Faith] of the Council of Chalcedon (AD. 451), which has generally been accepted as defining the limits of christological orthodoxy.

Early christology

Christianity appeared on the stage of history as a movement with a message of salvation. Its preachers announced that God was bringing [the restoration of all things] (Acts 3:21)—the new age promised by the prophets—when wrong would be righted and humanity reconciled to God. This proclamation was rooted in the life and ministry of Jesus of Nazareth, who himself had come preaching the near advent of the kingdom of God, God's definitive assertion of his rule. He had apparently seen his own ministry as a sign, a significant anticipation, of that coming redemption.

Early Christian preaching, however, was not based simply on the message of Jesus. Rather, it grew out of the conviction that the content of his message had been both validated and actualized through his resurrection from the dead. the powers which rule the present world-order had repudiated Jesus and slain him. But God had raised him up, and this meant that in him and for him the promised transformation of the world, [the life of the age to come,] was already real. Furthermore, it meant that people could . . .

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