Martyrdom: The Psychology, Theology, and Politics of Self-Sacrifice

Martyrdom: The Psychology, Theology, and Politics of Self-Sacrifice

Martyrdom: The Psychology, Theology, and Politics of Self-Sacrifice

Martyrdom: The Psychology, Theology, and Politics of Self-Sacrifice

Synopsis

Martyrdom is a controversial and disputed concept. Just as religion is often hijacked by politics, martyrdom is frequently ascribed to a narrow, partisan, and parochial foundation. This is the first book to present varied views on the topic of martyrdom, reaching beyond cliches and simplistic explanations to provoke deep consideration of the essential nature of human beings and society. The volume's authors- experts in the disciplines of psychology, theology, and politics- examine martyrdom in thoughtful and thought-provoking chapters. A closing conversation between the authors is designed to inspire further discourse and debate.

Readers engaged in the exploration of social justice, conflict, psychology, religion, and the politics of memory will find this book unique and stimulating. The authors have appeared on public television and public radio, as well as ABC, CBS, and NBC news and discussion programs.

Excerpt

Eric Berne said, [It takes three generations to make one neurotic,] and I believe that is also so to make a book. I owe much to my parents and grandparents and to the extended family they provided as my heritage. I have an equal debt to the people who in different ways in various parts of the world stimulated my research and directed me to the paper trails and the people paths that ultimately provided answers to my questions. Then there is a huge debt to the many social scientists, philosophers, and scholars who preceded me and wrote marvelously and extensively. My late teacher and mentor, Magda B. Arnold, whose life and work inspired my own, is paramount among these. And of course, I have been most fortunate in the collaborators for this volume. Each of them might easily have occupied their talents on a far more prestigious and lucrative project but agreed instead to work with me because we are concerned about martyrdom as an idea dominating this moment in human history.

I thought my next book would be Terror's Children. That manuscript has been growing in fits and starts over the past fifteen years and presented in papers and articles and chapters in other books. But maybe that will be the next one. My editor at Greenwood Press, Debora Carvalko, gave me so much initial reinforcement to pursue this book, that I yielded to temptation and became immersed and, for the past eight months, as monomaniacal as I could be while continuing my clinical practice and professional commitments. I came to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.