The Sword and the Grail: Of the Grail and the Templars and the True Discovery of America

The Sword and the Grail: Of the Grail and the Templars and the True Discovery of America

The Sword and the Grail: Of the Grail and the Templars and the True Discovery of America

The Sword and the Grail: Of the Grail and the Templars and the True Discovery of America

Synopsis

The discovery of a tombstone built by his ancestors set Andrew Sinclair on a trail that was to lead to major re-assessments, not only of our understanding of the discovery of America, but also of the origins of the Freemasons and their role in world history.

Excerpt

A SWORD AND a Grail in the shape of a chalice are carved on a stone in Rosslyn Chapel near Edinburgh in Scotland. The sword points to an early landfall and discovery of North America nearly a century before Columbus reached the West Indies. The steps of the Temple of Solomon incised into the base of the Grail initiate an investigation into the fate of the Knights Templars, who were officially dissolved early in the fourteenth century, but who have continued to exist to this day. They were reported to be the seekers and keepers of the Holy Grail — so Wolfram von Eschenbach wrote in his Parzifal — and of the Stone of Scone or Destiny and the Shroud of Turin. Some of them were known to have escaped to Scotland from France with their fleet and their treasure. Their symbols and associated rites evolved into the practices of the Masons of the world.

This story is history. But it is also a personal story, for the name written on a stone with a sword is Sir William de St Clair of that branch of the Sinclairs who have lived at Rosslyn Castle from the time of the Norman Conquest to the present day. All these stories start on that stone.

While staying in Rosslyn Castle at the beginning of this quest, I went to the chapel and asked if there was any connection with the Templars. The Curator was reluctant to say much, because the Templars had been condemned as heretics and their Grand Master . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.